My Folken talk

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I will be giving a talk on fiction writing at the next Folken gathering in Liverpool on 9th December. Pronounced Fol-ken (not Folk-en, that sounds a bit rude), which means “people”, the event aims to inspire and create networks and links for those who want to do something a little bit different in 2017.

It is free to get in, but you have to book here.

The Serving Library, 35 Water Street, Liverpool L2 0RD

6-9pm.

There will be wine!

In further news, I have a short story in Women’s Stories, Women’s Voices, a book published on 7th January 2017.

Read about my book reaching the second stage of the WriteNow novel writing competition, run by Penguin Random House, here

@cathbore

My book is through to #WriteNowLive in Manchester

 

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My book

Last month, I entered the first chapter of my book to WriteNow, a novel writing competition run by the publisher Penguin Random House UK, in association with Commonword up here in the north.

I’m dead happy my novel excerpt was accepted, and in February we pootle on over to Manchester to be involved in the next stage of the whole thing, the WriteNowLive event.

It’s all very exciting and I’m really chuffed. So, well done to my book.  I love you, book x

@cathbore

Radio show news

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I have a new radio show, 6-8pm each Monday. You can listen to it online here or if you’re in the Liverpool area, on 99.8fm. I’m playing lots of new releases, local music from the Merseyside area, and older songs I love a lot.

In other news, I have a short story in a new book, published in 2017. The book, A Furious Hope, will be available in print and e-book and, as the title suggests, is intended to offer some hope in these often grim times. More updates as I have them!

@cathbore

My week of libraries, and the humble butter pie

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(L-R) Cheshirati authors Zara Stoneley, (me), Nikki Ashton, Victoria Johns, Caroline James.

I chaired an author panel at Knutsford Library last week, with members of the fabulous Cheshirati.

We talked about sex (on the printed page, of course), self v traditional publishing, plotting (novels!), the value of writing groups, and why book bloggers are so flipping wonderful. We had a very lovely evening indeed, insightful questions from the audience keeping the talk lively and bopping along nicely. And there was wine, always a plus.

A third of the way through, though, a tangle of what looked like Donald Trump’s hair tumbled across the library’s carpeted floor…further inspection revealed it to be an orange-brown spider with the longest and thinnest legs in the history of the world ever. It was duly rescued and removed by a member of the audience. We wonder where that spider is now…

Afterwards, someone in Knutsford library tried to sell me a coat. In Liverpool pubs I’ve been offered ciggies, vodka, batteries, bacon etc etc – but it has never happened in a library before. I’m still musing over that.

Then at the weekend I was in Kendal Library, for a Get It Loud In Libraries show. As the name suggests, they put gigs on in libraries.

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Meilyr Jones at Kendal Library, part of the Get It Loud In Libraries initiative

I loved that Kendal Library was on a road called…

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Kendal!

On the way home the next day we stopped off at Wigan to buy butter pies, the good honest Lancashire comfort food of my youth.

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Butter pie!

The pie shop was on the corner of…

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Wigan!

I kid you not.

November is National Novel Writing Month, NaNoWriMo for short. Read best selling crime author Elizabeth Haynes’ shares her top NaNoWriMo tips with me here.

@cathbore

Loose women (and one man) in the library

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I chaired very cheery writers’ event at Nantwich Library this week.

 

Authors Nikki Ashton, Caroline James, Victoria Johns, John Paul Goss and poet Helen Kay spoke about self-publishing vs traditional publishing, writing practices and revealed (more or less!) all.

The Nantwich librarians kept us sustained with chocolate digestives and shortbread (we managed to ‘force’ them down).  At the end, they said “tonight was like an episode of Loose Women”.  We’re taking that as a compliment!

I loved this sign on the library’s toilet door. As soon as I saw it, a full episode of Seinfeld ran through my head:

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And the stairs had a Vertigo/Hitchcock vibe to them…

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I’m also on Instagram now, if you’d like to follow me on there.

@cathbore

You Promised

‘I’ll sing for you,’ you promise, but never do. Instead I get excuses and small talk, coy and cute in my ear.

‘Sing for me,’ I say. ‘You said you would.’

You blink and I wonder how your eyelashes manage to get so dark, your lips so dry, ones that peck me goodbye on the jaw, missing my mouth.

I roll on cooling bed sheets, damp flakes of skin sticking to me like static and take a sly lick of you from my leg. I suck each of my fingers, worming you out from under my nails. You are everywhere and I love it, I imagine you singing for me here and now. In my room, you, singing my song, and making it beautiful.

It doesn’t work. You’re not here. I sniff my arm. Your smell is gone and no crumbs of you garnish my bed. I have nothing of you, so I hum my song, and wish. I close my eyes and follow a ribbon of sound, hold onto it where it pulls me, over mountains and hills, round bends, down steep slopes and up. My calves hurt, stretched then shrinking as I climb, so I stop. I hear it, my song, faint and low. I sway under a navy sky. Night breezes brush my mouth. My lips swell.

I follow my song. I inch up a tree, your bark scratches my inner thighs raw but I shimmy up and up until I peer into a window. It’s you. You smile from behind thick glass, impenetrable, opaque, and sing my song, the one I love. You’re singing my song, as I asked, but you sing my song for her, and not for me, never me. Still, I settle and listen. It is beautiful, the song and you, exactly as I imagined.

First published in Landmarks, National Flash Fiction Day Anthology 2015.

Read “Good Manchester Rain” over at Flash Flood Journal 2016 here.

Rants, and flashes

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I Hope You Like Feminist Rants issue 2

It’s been a messy old week, what with the EU referendum, but a couple of nice things have happened to me. We need to cling onto whatever lovely things there are, I think.

Issue 2 of indie publication/zine I Hope You Like Feminist Rants, edited by Golden Boy author Abigail Tarttelin, came out on Friday. The theme for this issue is motherhood. I have Baby Love, an essay on non-motherhood, in it. You can buy Rants online, but if you are fortunate enough to live in Liverpool you will find it for sale in the News From Nowhere bookshop on Bold St, which is wonderful news.

Also, yesterday was National Flash Fiction Day. The annual Flash Flood Journal carries my short story Good Manchester Rain.  I’m glad I submitted this story, it’s quite European in nature – romantic, smutty, and with lots of rain. Like a European short film! You can read Good Manchester Rain here.

@cathbore